Improvement of Medical Imaging Course by Modeling of Positron Emission Tomography

  • Huiting Qiao
  • Libin Wang
  • Wenyong Liu
  • Yu Wang
  • Shuyu Li
  • Fang Pu
  • Deyu Li
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 269)

Abstract

With the development of nuclear medical imaging, the medical imaging course has been developed in Beihang University. As an important part of nuclear medical imaging, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is introduced in the imaging course with the methods of modeling and simulation. Phamacokinetics model, Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) and Visible Human Project (VHP) datasets have been used to simulate the principle of PET imaging, which have made students understand the course more easily. The method that integrates imaging and modeling is potential and effective in the interdisciplinary teaching.

Keywords

Imaging Modeling Simulation Education 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81101123, No. 61108084), Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China and Education development Project of Beihang University.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Huiting Qiao
    • 1
  • Libin Wang
    • 1
  • Wenyong Liu
    • 1
  • Yu Wang
    • 1
  • Shuyu Li
    • 1
  • Fang Pu
    • 1
  • Deyu Li
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Biological Science and Medical EngineeringBeihang UniversityBeijingChina

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