Classifying and Diagnosing 199 Impacted Permanent Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

  • Xu-xia Wang
  • Jian-guang Xu
  • Yun Chen
  • Chao Liu
  • Jun Zheng
  • Wan-xin Liu
  • Rui Dong
  • Jun Zhang
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 269)

Abstract

Grasping the position of embedded teeth in jaw bone and their spatial relationship with neighboring anatomical structures accurately is the foundation of orthodontic and maxillofacial surgical treatments. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), a newly developed imaging technique, which produces high definition and high resolution three-dimensional volumetric images, can provide accurate dynamic 3D images and six-surfaces visual angle for locating embedded teeth to get intuitive fault images in comparison with conventional CT. CBCT is being used in the practice of oral and maxillofacial radiology with increasing frequency to make up the shortcomings of traditional plane images. The purpose of this prospective study was to use CBCT to locate 199 impacted teeth of 103 patients, and make a classification.

Keywords

Embedded teeth Cone beam CT Classification Diagnosis Orthodontics 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was funded by Shandong Provincial Educational, Scientific and Cultural Special Subject (2011107).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xu-xia Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jian-guang Xu
    • 3
  • Yun Chen
    • 1
  • Chao Liu
    • 4
  • Jun Zheng
    • 1
  • Wan-xin Liu
    • 1
  • Rui Dong
    • 1
  • Jun Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.School of StomatologyShandong UniversityJinanChina
  2. 2.Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral BiomedicineJinanChina
  3. 3.School of StomatologyAnhui Medical UniversityHefeiChina
  4. 4.Department of OrthodonticsShandong Provincial Shengli HospitalJinanChina

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