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Migration

  • Stanley K. Smith
  • Jeff Tayman
  • David A. Swanson
Chapter
Part of the The Springer Series on Demographic Methods and Population Analysis book series (PSDE, volume 37)

Abstract

The United States is a nation of movers. In a typical year, about 15% of the U.S. population moves to a different place of residence. Moving rates vary considerably from place to place and change over time, however, making it difficult to forecast migration accurately. In this chapter, we discuss a variety of concepts, measures, and definitions of mobility and migration. We describe data sources that can be used to collect migration information and describe some of the basic methods for measuring migration. To set the stage for developing assumptions regarding future migration patterns, we consider the determinants of migration and some of the characteristics of migrants. We then describe the data and techniques that can be used to project future migration flows, focusing on issues with particular importance for states and local areas. We pay special attention to the migration data collected in American Community Survey and close with an assessment of the impact of migration on population projections.

Keywords

Migration Rate Census Bureau American Community Survey Migration Data Decennial Census 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley K. Smith
    • 1
  • Jeff Tayman
    • 2
  • David A. Swanson
    • 3
  1. 1.Bureau of Economic and Business ResearchUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Economics DepartmentUniversity of California-San DiegoSan DiegoUSA
  3. 3.Department of SociologyUniversity of California RiversideRiversideUSA

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