Geochemistry of Capillary Hydrogeochemical Systems in Arid Environments

Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series C: Environmental Security book series (NAPSC)

Abstract

In arid environments, porous media are unsaturated with water which is submitted to capillary constraints. The present chapter focuses on the geochemical impacts of such physical constraints and how theoretical analysis can help interpreting field or laboratory observations. The basic principles of capillary geochemistry suggest that the fate of contaminants, either organic or inorganic, can be significantly impacted in terms of reactive mass transfer in addition to flow and transport processes. All these mechanisms are closely interconnected, what makes the description of the behavior of such systems very complicated. An important work still has to be done in order to achieve such a goal: a number of mechanisms are not taken into account in the current state of development of the capillary geochemistry, namely mechanisms that occur in the thinnest confining geometries, like disjoining pressures, surface forces, etc.

Keywords

Porous Medium Capillary Pressure Thermodynamic Database Hydrated Mineral Capillary System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work has received support from the French Agency for Research (Agence Nationale de la Recherche, ANR) through the grants CONGE BLAN-61001 and Labex Voltaire ANR-10-LABX-100-01.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arnault Lassin
    • 1
  • Lionel Mercury
    • 2
  • Mohamed Azaroual
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut des Sciences de la Terre d’Orléans, UMR 7327 Université d’Orléans - CNRS - BRGM, BRGMOrléans, Cedex 2France
  2. 2.Institute of Earth SciencesUniversity of OrléansOrléansFrance

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