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Patterns and Changes in Household Structure in Hong Kong

  • Edward Jow-Ching Tu
  • Jianping Wang
Chapter
Part of the The Springer Series on Demographic Methods and Population Analysis book series (PSDE, volume 35)

Abstract

Hong Kong was a British colony until 1997, when it was returned to China and became a special administrative region. Since its cession from China to Britain in 1842, Hong Kong has experienced massive population growth. At the beginning of its colonial status, Hong Kong was a small fishing village. The first census published in May 1841 found the total population of Hong Kong to be only 7,450 inhabitants (Ng 1984). In 20011, Hong Kong’s population reached 7.07 million (Census and Statistics Department 2012). Now, Hong Kong is a modern city characterized by a high level of economic development and an urban population. Hong Kong attracts residents from all over the world, although the majority of its population is Chinese (Census and Statistics Department 2012).

Keywords

Household Size Nuclear Family Household Composition Household Structure Small Household 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Social ScienceHong Kong University of Science and TechnologyHong KongChina
  2. 2.Center for Social and Economic ResearchHong Kong University of Science and TechnologyHong KongChina

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