Advertisement

Teachers’ Beliefs, Classroom Practices and Professional Development Towards Socio-scientific Issues

  • Virginie Albe
  • Catherine Barrué
  • Larry Bencze
  • Anne Kristine Byhring
  • Lyn Carter
  • Marcus Grace
  • Erik Knain
  • Dankert Kolstø
  • Pedro Reis
  • Erin Sperling
Chapter
Part of the Contributions from Science Education Research book series (CFSE, volume 1)

Abstract

In this chapter we propose to contribute to research in socio-scientific issues (SSIs) by putting forward a discussion of factors that influence science teachers’ SSI teaching and of the type of teaching needed to prepare students for active participation in SSIs. Contributions from researchers in four different European countries, Canada and Australia are presented. In an analytical perspective, two studies identified secondary science teachers’ viewpoints on SSI teaching and factors that positively influence the implementation of classroom discussion activities on SSIs. In an interventionist perspective, three studies investigated student teachers’ and teachers’ professional development towards promotion of student-led, research-informed activism to address SSIs or towards the implementation of inquiry-based science teaching (IBST) to develop students’ participation in complex environmental SSIs. Results from the diverse contributions showed that teachers’ views on the concept of citizenry differ, their views on their own competency differ and teachers’ competencies and concerns as teachers impact their interpretation of science curricula and views on SSI teaching. Different types of professional development, exemplified by student teacher courses and in-service action research, might to some extent change teachers’ views of SSI teaching or result in promising inquiry-based SSI teaching practices. A general hypothesis that might be drawn from this chapter is that science teachers’ concepts of citizenry and SSI teaching are essential for their effort to implement SSI teaching and for their success in preparing students for dealing with the complexity of SSIs.

Keywords

Science Teacher Student Teacher Science Curriculum Classroom Discussion Specific Competency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Barrué, C., & Albe, V. (2011). New approach in french middle schools: A possible congruence between SSIs and citizenship education. Paper presented at the ESERA Conference, Lyon, 5th–9th September 2011.Google Scholar
  2. Barton, D. (2007). Literacy. An introduction to the ecology of written language. Malden/Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  3. Bencze, L., Sperling, E., & Carter, L. (2011). Students’ research-informed socio-scientific activism: Re/visions for a sustainable future. Research in Science Education, 48(6), 648–669.Google Scholar
  4. Bogdan, R., & Biklen, S. (1992). Qualitative research for education. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.Google Scholar
  5. Carlson, M. O. B., Humphrey, G. E., & Reinhardt, K. S. (2003). Weaving science inquiry and continuous assessment. Using formative assessment to improve learning. Thousand Oakes: Corwin Press.Google Scholar
  6. Carter, L. (2005). Globalisation and science education: Rethinking science education reforms. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 42(5), 561–580.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Charmaz, K. (2000). Grounded theory: Objectivist and constructivist methods. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), Handbook of qualitative research (pp. 509–535). Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  8. Galvão, C., Reis, P., & Freire, S. (2010). Enhancing the popularity and the relevance of science teaching in Portuguese science classes. Research in Science Education. doi:  10.1007/s11165-010-9184-3
  9. Guba, E. G., & Lincoln, Y. S. (1988). Naturalistic and rationalistic enquiry. In J. P. Keeves (Ed.), Educational research, methodology and measurement: An international handbook (pp. 81–85). London: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  10. Helms, J. V. (1998). Science ‒ and me: Subject matter and identity in secondary school science teachers. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 35(7), 811–834.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Hodson, D. (2003). Time for action: Science education for an alternative future. International Journal of Science Education, 25(6), 645–670.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Hodson, D. (2008). Towards scientific literacy: A teachers’ guide to the history, philosophy and sociology of science. Rotterdam: Sense.Google Scholar
  13. Knain, E., & Byhring, A. K. (2011). Coping with complex environmental issues by Inquiry-based teaching. Paper presented at the ESERA Conference, Lyon, 5th–9th September 2011.Google Scholar
  14. Kolstø, S. (2001). Scientific literacy for citizenship: Tools for dealing with the science dimension of controversial socio-scientific issues. Science Education, 85(3), 291–310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Kolstø, S. D., & Knain, E. (2011). Methodological competencies needed to deal with the complexity of SSIs: Inquiry-based methods as the way and as the goal. Paper presented at the ESERA Conference, Lyon, 5th–9th September 2011.Google Scholar
  16. Kress, G. (2003). Literacy in the new media age. London/New York: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Lee, H., Abd-el-Khalick, F., & Choi, K. (2006). Korean science teachers’ perceptions of the introduction of socio-scientific issues into the science curriculum. Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education, 6, 97–117.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Lester, B. T., Ma, L., Lee, O., & Lambert, J. (2006). Social activism in elementary science education: A science, technology and society approach to teach global warming. International Journal of Science Education, 28(4), 315–339.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Levinson, R., & Turner, S. (2001). The teaching of social and ethical issues in the school curriculum, arising from developments in biomedical research: A research study of teachers. Final Report to The Wellome Trust by The Science and Technology Group, Institute of Education, University of London.Google Scholar
  20. McVaugh, J. (2010). Problem-based learning. In A. Stibbe (Ed.), The handbook of sustainability literacy. Skills for a Changing World.Google Scholar
  21. Millar, R., & Hunt, A. (2002). Science for public understanding: A different way to teach and learn science. School Science Review, 83(304), 35–42.Google Scholar
  22. Newton, P. (1999). The place of argumentation in the pedagogy of school science. International Journal of Science Education, 21(5), 553–576.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. NRC. (1996). Inquiry and the national science education standards. A guide for teaching and learning. Washington, DC: National Research Council/National Academy Press.Google Scholar
  24. Reis, P., & Galvão, C. (2009). Teaching controversial socio-scientific issues in biology and geology classes: A case study. Electronic Journal of Science Education, 13(1), 162–185. Available at http://ejse.southwestern.edu/volumes/v13n1/v13n1.pdf Google Scholar
  25. Roth, W.-M., & Lee, S. (2004). Science education as/for participation in the community. Science Education, 88, 263–291.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Sadler, T. D. (2004). Informal reasoning regarding socio-scientific issues: A critical review of research. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 41, 513–536.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Sadler, T. D. (2009). Situated learning in science education: Socio-scientific issues as contexts for practice. Studies in Science Education, 45(1), 1–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Sadler, T. D., Amirshokoohi, A., Kazempour, M., & Allspaw, K. M. (2006). Socio-science and ethics in science classrooms: Teacher perspectives and strategies. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 43, 353–376.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Sismondo, S. (2008). Science and technology studies and an engaged program. In E. J. Hackett, E. Sperling, & J. L. Bencze (Eds.), (2010). More than particle theory: Citizenship through school science. Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education. 10(3), 255–26.Google Scholar
  30. Sperling, E., & Bencze, J. L. (2010). More than particle theory: Citizenship through school science. Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, 10(3), 255–266.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Wallace, C. S. (2004). Framing new research in science literacy and language use: Authenticity, multiple discourses and the ‘Third Space”. Science Education, 88(6), 901–914.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Virginie Albe
    • 1
  • Catherine Barrué
    • 1
  • Larry Bencze
    • 2
  • Anne Kristine Byhring
    • 3
  • Lyn Carter
    • 4
  • Marcus Grace
    • 5
  • Erik Knain
    • 3
  • Dankert Kolstø
    • 6
  • Pedro Reis
    • 7
  • Erin Sperling
    • 2
  1. 1.STEFEcole Normale Supérieure de CachanCachanFrance
  2. 2.Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)University of TorontoTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Norwegian University of Life SciencesÅsNorway
  4. 4.Trescowthick School of EducationAustralian Catholic UniversityBanyoAustralia
  5. 5.Southampton Education SchoolUniversity of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK
  6. 6.Department of Physics and TechnologyUniversity of BergenBergenNorway
  7. 7.Instituto de EducaçãoUniversidade de LisboaLisbonPortugal

Personalised recommendations