Survivors of Childhood Cancer: Risk of Glioma and Meningioma Following Radiotherapy

Chapter
Part of the Tumors of the Central Nervous System book series (TCNS, volume 12)

Abstract

Pediatric cancer survival rates have improved significantly over the past several decades as advances have been made in both therapies and supportive care. Improved survival rates have been accompanied by increased recognition of therapy-related late effects, such as second neoplasms. Two of the most common classes of pediatric cancers include acute leukemias and tumors of the central nervous system, both of which have historically involved CNS-directed radiation therapy. Through multiple childhood cancer survivor cohorts, it has been recognized that survivors previously treated with radiation to the central nervous system are at increased risk for developing secondary gliomas and meningiomas, both of which have been shown to occur at well-defined time points and in a dose-responsive fashion. Based on these findings, current era treatment protocols have been modified to minimize toxicity and reduce the use of radiation when possible. Long term follow up of cancer survivors remains an imperative part of their ongoing care given the long latency period that has been observed to development of secondary CNS tumors.

Keywords

Central Nervous System Tumor Cranial Radiation Childhood Cancer Survivor Tinea Capitis Central Nervous System Relapse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgement

This work was supported by the Children’s Cancer Research Fund, Minneapolis, MN and the National Institutes of Health Pediatric Cancer Epidemiology Training Grant T32 CA099936.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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