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Starting with Stories: The Power of Socio-Ecological Narrative

  • Brian Wattchow
  • Ruth Jeanes
  • Laura Alfrey
  • Trent Brown
  • Amy Cutter-Mackenzie
  • Justen O’Connor
Chapter

Abstract

In this first chapter we felt it important to introduce the editors of the book via a series of short autobiographical stories. In each case the author has chosen a few influential experiences that they believe have been crucial in shaping the development of their socio-ecological outlook as educators and researchers. In other words, in this first section of the book we are putting practical, lived experience prior to the theoretical explanation of what it means to be a socio-ecological educator. In this first chapter of Part I we want to lead with example and narrative. We then explore and reinforce the message with sound theoretical discussion of the crucial concepts that make up this unique perspective on educational philosophy and practice. In Part II of the book, different authors from a variety of backgrounds and work contexts explore socio-ecological ideas and practices via a range of case studies. Finally, in the conclusion chapter we summarise the book and reflect on the incorporation of a socio-ecological approach into educational and research settings.

Keywords

Narrative Socio-ecology Reflection Experience 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian Wattchow
    • 1
  • Ruth Jeanes
    • 1
  • Laura Alfrey
    • 1
  • Trent Brown
    • 1
  • Amy Cutter-Mackenzie
    • 2
  • Justen O’Connor
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of EducationMonash UniversityFrankstonAustralia
  2. 2.School of EducationSouthern Cross UniversityGold CoastAustralia

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