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Origins of Industrial Production and Prefabrication

  • Luca Caneparo
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter begins with the recent history of mass production, looking for a parallel with the contemporary development of prefabrication in construction and comparing developments in the United States with those in Germany. The United States pursued interchangeability of parts and standardisation in manufacturing from the time of its foundation onwards. This promoted and supported the initial stages of development and industrialisation, ultimately including mass production. Consideration is given to the driving role played by automotive manufacturing in developing the methodologies and the technologies of mass production and their role in the construction industry; and to the impetus given by the Second World War, which brought to fruition the process innovations developed by each country in response to the demands of the war and which played an important part in the outcomes of the conflict. While mass production tremendously increases the quantity of products and decreases their cost, the market was not particularly inclined to allow the mass production of housing. In the 1920s, when customers began to value other aspects apart from price, industries began to consider new manufacturing strategies—Ford himself for instance introduced the concept of flexible mass production. The construction industry stressed flexibility in design and manufacturing systems.

Keywords

Machine Tool Mass Production Assembly Line Conveyor Belt General Panel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luca Caneparo
    • 1
  1. 1.DAD - Dipartimento di Architettura e DesignPolitecnico di TorinoTorinoItaly

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