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Academe: A Profession Like No Other

  • James J. F. Forest
Chapter
Part of the Higher Education Dynamics book series (HEDY, volume 42)

Abstract

This chapter draws on the wealth of scholarly literature on the academic profession to reflect on the intersection between the human experience and the transfer of knowledge at the global, disciplinary, and individual levels. Altbach’s contributions to this literature are highlighted, including his analysis of globalization and the “centers-peripheries of learning” framework. The discussion will also review the unique power and responsibilities that come with being in the academic profession, and how one professor with the right mix of personal and professional attributes can produce an array of positive impacts on the lives of countless others.

Keywords

Academic Freedom High Education System Funding Constraint Academic Profession Professional Socialization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Security Studies Program, School of Criminology and Justice StudiesUniversity of Massachusetts at LowellLowellUSA

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