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Linguistic Pluralism in European Studies

  • Stefania Baroncelli
Chapter
Part of the Innovation and Change in Professional Education book series (ICPE, volume 9)

Abstract

The chapter focuses on the concept of linguistic pluralism as interpreted by the European Union (EU) and applied in European Studies courses. In the first part, it discusses the linguistic policy adopted by the EU on the basis of Regulation 1/1958 and the case law of the European Court of Justice. We argue that while the EU has adopted a linguistic policy for aspects dealing with persons’ and states’ relationship with their institutions, it relies on the choices of member states and universities for aspects related to teaching languages, especially in European Studies courses. In the second part, it focuses on the results of an online survey to assess how linguistic pluralism is applied in European Studies. Our research highlights the lack of courses taught in foreign languages other than English as well as the neutral attitude of the Jean Monnet Programme of the EU in promoting teaching in a foreign language, including in English. We argue that linguistic pluralism in teaching European Studies courses is intended more as a static respect for member states’ and single institutions’ linguistic policies than as an active tool. The chapter then identifies the member states which have promoted English as teaching language in European Studies courses and the role of the Jean Monnet Programme within different countries. The final part of the chapter deals with some specific disciplines in European Studies.

Keywords

European Union Member State Linguistic Diversity Teaching Language Official Language 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EconomicsFree University of Bozen-BolzanoBozen-BolzanoItaly

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