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Theoretical Underpinnings of Practical Strategies for Changing Travel Behaviour

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Handbook of Sustainable Travel
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Abstract

Several types of practical strategies have been implemented to change travel behaviour in a socially desirable direction. Examples include investments in infrastructure designed to increase the benefits of using non-motorized travel modes and measures to decrease the benefits of car use. Behavioural change strategies termed mobility management have also been implemented to increase awareness and influence psychological factors to encourage voluntary change from car use to other travel modes. An integrated process model of behavioural change is described. The model implies important roles of intention, attitude, awareness, responsibility, moral, norm, and habit. It is important to identify and understand how these psychological variables involved in behavioural change are influenced by transport policies as well as how they operate irrespectively of a particular transport policy. In this context, it is argued that a combination of transport policy measures will be more effective in changing travel behaviour than will single measures.

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Correspondence to Ayako Taniguchi .

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Fujii, S., Taniguchi, A. (2014). Theoretical Underpinnings of Practical Strategies for Changing Travel Behaviour. In: Gärling, T., Ettema, D., Friman, M. (eds) Handbook of Sustainable Travel. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-7034-8_10

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