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Epistemological Challenges for Information Science: Constructing Information

Part of the Studies in History and Philosophy of Science book series (AUST,volume 34)

Abstract

All disciplines must sustain their claims to be part of the general academic and intellectual enquiry. There must be objects or processes to investigate, a set of problems, and distinctive stances, theories, and methods. Successful disciplines gain general acceptance and recognition.

Information Science faces problems in attaining that status. First, many disciplines have their own technical understanding of, and definition of, information. Information Science must either generate a universal understanding of information, or produce a generic way of handling information. Second, Information Science has to develop distinctive ways of producing knowledge. This chapter shows how conventional approaches to these problems can be enhanced by a constructivist analysis of the role of Information Science in the academic community. The chapter examines claims that Information Science can make, how those claims can contribute to the development of other disciplines, and what problems must be faced to sustain those claims.

Keywords

  • Information Science
  • Social Practice
  • Information Resource
  • Information Problem
  • Information Profession

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    I use ‘logical surrogates’ to mean all things like abstracts or catalogue records that can represent the content of a document.

  2. 2.

    There is much more to be said, more than can be dealt with here, about the way reasons and principles bolster these arguments about information.

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Correspondence to Ian Cornelius .

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Cornelius, I. (2014). Epistemological Challenges for Information Science: Constructing Information. In: Ibekwe-SanJuan, F., Dousa, T. (eds) Theories of Information, Communication and Knowledge. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, vol 34. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6973-1_8

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