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Part of the book series: Studies in the History of Philosophy of Mind ((SHPM,volume 12))

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Abstract

The investigation of memory in sixteenth-century philosophy was dominated by the traditional idea of memory as an inner sense which is located in the posterior ventricle of the brain and which is capable of retaining sensory species as well as recalling them when the perceived objects are no longer present. The theory of memory was hence closely connected to the theory of perception. The old distinction of memory and recollection was often mentioned, though some authors gave the name ‘memory’ to both functions (1). In early modern philosophy, much attention was paid to questions of the efficiency of memory, such as which physical conditions are favourable to memory and how the capacity of memory can be strengthened and developed by various mnemonic methods. These items have also an obvious connection to learning and pedagogy (2).

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Correspondence to Tuomo Aho .

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Aho, T. (2014). Early Modern Theories. In: Knuuttila, S., Sihvola, J. (eds) Sourcebook for the History of the Philosophy of Mind. Studies in the History of Philosophy of Mind, vol 12. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6967-0_15

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