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The Military Environment

  • Wenke Apt
Chapter
Part of the Demographic Research Monographs book series (DEMOGRAPHIC)

Abstract

Trends in the military environment give an indication of future mission scenarios, and hence the future demand for soldiers and equipment, both in terms of quantity and quality. They equally provide insight into the military tasks to be accomplished and the purpose for intervention (i.e. how, when, where, how often, why).

With the end of the Cold War, the world order became increasingly multi-centric, the nature of security threats changed, and the number of multinational peacekeeping operations increased. Simultaneously, a variety of socio-cultural trends emerged that challenged the overall legitimacy of the military and its ability to recruit and retain quality personnel. Throughout this process, four main change drivers of security policy decision-making evolved in the internal and external environment. They influence the foreign policy orientation of states and the functional role set of the military. These trends in the economic environment, technological environment, geostrategic environment, and socio-cultural environment are discussed and provide the backdrop of the discussion on future mission scenarios and changes in the military organization.

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Policy Armed Force Armed Conflict Foreign Direct Investment Inflow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wenke Apt
    • 1
  1. 1.VDI/VDE Innovation + Technik GmbHBerlinGermany

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