Transplantation

  • Duncan Dartrey Adams
  • Christopher Dartrey Adams
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Public Health book series (BRIEFSPUBLIC)

Abstract

The histocompatibility system is responsible for the rejection of allografts. The system exists to counter the explosive speed of viral replication (Table 3.1). It does this by directing the defensive immune attack by cytotoxic T cells on to histocompatibility antigens that have been altered by extrusion of a viral peptide on the infected cell’s surface [1]. This enables destruction of the virus factories that the infected cells become, before the cytotoxic T cells are swamped by the myriad numbers of new virions, a thousand coming from each infected cell every 10 h in influenza infection [2]. The immunity system mistakes alloantigens for virus-infected host cells that need swift destruction.

Keywords

Infected Cell Viral Replication Virus Factory Allogeneic Bone Influenza Infection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are indebted to Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Peter Crampton for encouragement, information, advice and administrative support.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Duncan Dartrey Adams
    • 1
  • Christopher Dartrey Adams
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of MedicineUniversity of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand
  2. 2.Analogue Digital InstrumentsDunedinNew Zealand

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