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Wetland Wildlife Monitoring and Assessment

  • Matthew J. Gray
  • Michael J. Chamberlain
  • David A. Buehler
  • William B. Sutton
Chapter

Abstract

Monitoring wetland wildlife is complex and requires use of various techniques to obtain robust population estimates. Herpetofauna, birds and mammals frequently inhabit wetlands and adjacent uplands. Sampling herpetofauna can include passive techniques such as visual encounter and breeding call surveys, and capture techniques that use nets and traps. Common bird monitoring techniques include scan surveys, point counts, nest searches, and aerial surveys. Some mammals, such as bats, can be sampled with audio devices, whereas mark-recapture techniques are most effective for other taxa. For all groups, the techniques used depend on the monitoring objective and target species. This chapter describes various techniques for monitoring populations of wetland wildlife. If these techniques are incorporated into a robust sampling design, they can be used to document changes in species occurrence, relative abundance, and survival.

Keywords

Aerial Survey Radio Telemetry Cover Object Breeding Bird Survey Minnow Trap 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew J. Gray
    • 1
  • Michael J. Chamberlain
    • 2
  • David A. Buehler
    • 1
  • William B. Sutton
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Forestry, Wildlife and FisheriesUniversity of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA
  2. 2.Warnell School of Forestry and Natural ResourcesUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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