Methods for Sampling and Analyzing Wetland Fungi

  • Steven L. Stephenson
  • Clement Tsui
  • Adam W. Rollins
Chapter

Abstract

Most fungi are terrestrial, but representatives of all major groups of fungi along with three groups of fungus-like organisms (water molds, slime molds and lichens), usually studied by mycologists, can be found in wetlands. The primary ecological role of the fungi and water molds in wetland habitats is to decompose dead plant material—both woody and herbaceous debris as well as dead bryophytes. Although sometimes present in wetlands, slime molds and lichens occur almost exclusively on emergent (dry) substrates. Because the vast majority of fungi and fungus-like organisms associated with wetlands are microscopic, efforts to document their distribution and patterns of occurrence often pose a real challenge to ecologists. This chapter reviews some of the more useful and effective methods that can be used to study these organisms in wetland habitats. These include collecting specimens directly in the field, isolating specimens from substrate samples placed in moist chamber cultures and obtaining specimens on various types of organic baits.

Keywords

Fruiting Body Woody Debris Wetland Habitat Slime Mold Dead Plant Material 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven L. Stephenson
    • 1
  • Clement Tsui
    • 2
  • Adam W. Rollins
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Forest and Conservation SciencesUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  3. 3.Department of BiologyLincoln Memorial UniversityHarrogateUSA

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