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Social Justice, Transformation and Indigenous Methodologies

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Ethnographic Worldviews

Abstract

This chapter addresses the challenges for methodology when researchers want research to address issues of social justice and contribute positively to social transformation and still be seen as credible and fundable by research agencies. These are important aspirations that indigenous communities frequently express in regards to research and are explicit challenges that many indigenous researchers seek to address when conceptualising and designing research programmes. The chapter will also examine some of the practical solutions that indigenous research has generated in recent times.

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Correspondence to Linda Tuhiwai Smith .

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© 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

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Smith, L.T. (2014). Social Justice, Transformation and Indigenous Methodologies. In: Rinehart, R., Barbour, K., Pope, C. (eds) Ethnographic Worldviews. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6916-8_2

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