Teaching and Research Across Higher Education Systems: Typology and Implications

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter developed a system model of teaching and research activities to conceptualize the CAP survey, which is then narrowed down by focusing on how academics’ perceptions and their activities are interrelated with each other and how they are influenced by contextual factors such as the historical origin of higher education systems and their management reforms. Based on these discussions, the study classified the 19 higher education systems by academics’ research preference and their actual time input in research using k-means cluster analysis. This study found that eight systems are research focused and most of them are in Europe, four systems are teaching focused, and the remaining seven systems are teaching-research-balanced systems.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EducationSeoul National UniversitySeoulSouth Korea
  2. 2.Graduate School of Education and HDGeorge Washington UniversityWashington, DCUSA

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