Introduction to Democratic Culture and Moral Character: A Study in Culture and Personality

Chapter

Abstract

It can be said that what is equal and unequal in traditional and modern societies are the reverse of each other. There is now more equality of opportunity for top positions but the very existence of so much modern dependence on endless economic growth based on division of labor that results at times in intense competition, and at other times in bureaucratic subservience, produces social inequalities even as the standard of living rises. If anything, the attempt to rebuild such intimate communal feelings often makes the factionalism, so driven by economic rivalries, even worse. That is because religious and ideological rivalries combine with economic interests to muddy politics.

Keywords

Eighteenth Century Borderline Personality Disorder Social Solidarity Political Democracy Social Conformity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ChicagoUSA

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