The Simulation Study on Harvested Power in Synchronized Switch Harvesting on Inductor

  • Jang Woo Park
  • Honggeun Kim
  • Chang-Sun Shin
  • Kyungryong Cho
  • Yong-Yun Cho
  • Kisuk Kim
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 240)

Abstract

Different piezoelectric harvester interface circuits are demonstrated and compared through SPICE simulation. The simulations of the effect of switch triggering offset and switch on time duration on SSHI’s power are performed. The inductor’s quality factors in synchronized switch harvesting on inductor interface have important effect on the harvested power. Parallel SSHI shows the optimal output voltage to harvest the maximum power varies according to the Q severely. It is concluded that switch triggering offset has more impact on the s-SSHI than p-SSHI and the switch on-time duration is more important in case of the p-SSHI. p-SSHI shows when the on-time duration becomes more than 1.3 times or less than 0.7 times of exact duration time, the harvested power gets negligible. s-SSHI reveals the characteristics that when less than 1.5 times exact on-time duration, the harvested power varies significantly with the on-time duration.

Keywords

Piezoelectric Energy harvesting SSHI 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Industrial Strategic technology development program, 10041766, Development of energy management technologies with small capacity based on marine resources funded by the Ministry of Knowledge Economy (MKE, Korea) and this work (Grants No. R00045044) was supported by Business for Cooperative R&D between Industry, Academy, and Research Institute funded Korea Small and Medium Business Administration.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht(Outside the USA) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jang Woo Park
    • 1
  • Honggeun Kim
    • 1
  • Chang-Sun Shin
    • 1
  • Kyungryong Cho
    • 1
  • Yong-Yun Cho
    • 1
  • Kisuk Kim
    • 2
  1. 1.Department Information and Communication EngineeringSunchon National UniversitySuncheonRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Power Engineering Co., LtdGwangyangRepublic of Korea

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