Hume the Infidel

  • Alan Bailey
  • Dan O’Brien
Chapter
Part of the The New Synthese Historical Library book series (SYNL, volume 72)

Abstract

When David Hume died in Edinburgh in 1776, his reputation as one of the leading British critics of Christianity and all forms of religion was sufficiently firmly established in the popular mind that many people in the city expected his funeral to be the occasion for either some form of public disorder or, even more extravagantly, a miraculous sign of God’s displeasure at the life led by so unrepentant and prosperous an infidel. According to Samuel Jackson Pratt:

Keywords

Religious Belief Intelligent Designer Natural Theology Design Argument Sceptical Paradox 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Bailey
    • 1
  • Dan O’Brien
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Law, Social Sciences and CommunicationsUniversity of WolverhamptonWolverhamptonUK
  2. 2.Department of History, Philosophy and ReligionOxford Brookes UniversityOxfordUK

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