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Research Design

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Part of the SpringerBriefs in Earth Sciences book series (BRIEFSEARTH)

Abstract

This chapter deals with the research design and its parts. A research design is the arrangement of conditions for collection and analysis of data. It facilitates the smooth flow of various research processes. It would result in more accurate results with minimum usage of time, effort and money. The research design is considered as an ‘outline’ or ‘conceptual structure’ or ‘blueprint’ for research. Some basic questions that need to be addressed are: which questions to study, which data are relevant, what data to collect, and how to analyze the data. These basic questions may raise some other questions. These questions may be theoretical or practical in nature. The best design depends on the research question as well as the orientation of the researcher. Research design has, in general, the following four parts: (1) sampling design, (2) observational design, (3) analytical design, and (4) operational design. These parts of research design are cross-cutting and one complements others.

Keywords

  • Remote sensing
  • Research
  • Design
  • Philosophy
  • Sampling
  • Observation
  • Theory
  • Measurement
  • Variable
  • Relationship
  • Validity
  • Reliability

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-94-007-6594-8_5
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Correspondence to Basudeb Bhatta .

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Bhatta, B. (2013). Research Design. In: Research Methods in Remote Sensing. SpringerBriefs in Earth Sciences. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6594-8_5

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