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Historical Developments, Drivers of Change and Future Scenarios for Human Activities on Deception Island

  • Luis R. PertierraEmail author
  • Pablo Tejedo
  • Javier Benayas
Chapter

Abstract

Deception Island is an active volcano with a flooded caldera and numerous glaciers, providing a unique habitat to very rare biological assemblies. Deception Island has a long history of human activity and is currently one of the most visited locations in the Antarctic. Natural, scientific and tourism values coexist in a small area. Some activities may interfere with others and can potentially compromise the future conservation of the island and its unique values. Under the Antarctic Treaty System (ATS), regulatory mechanisms have been developed to provide different levels of protection to the island in order to minimise the inevitable environmental impacts and cumulative effects arising from existing human activities. Six Treaty parties manage Deception Island collectively as Antarctic Specially Managed Area (ASMA) No. 4 which has been identified as an exemplar of strategic environmental management. However, under the ATS the success of policies is highly dependent on the level of stakeholder acceptance. In this chapter, through a review of the environmental impacts, regulatory mechanisms, current trends and drivers for change we examine a range of possible management scenarios that combine different levels of environmental standards with varying likelihoods of stakeholder acceptance. Success of any of these policies will rely on information provided by monitoring programmes.

Keywords

Antarctic specially protected area Environment Management Conservation  

Notes

Acknowledgments

This paper was contributed by the project: EVA-ANTARCTICA. It was supported by the Spanish Government (CTM2009-06604-E). We would like to thank the Spanish Polar Committee, the SM BIO Las Palmas of the Spanish Navy, the Unit of Marine Technology (UMT) from CSIC, the Spanish station Gabriel de Castilla and the military members that provided data and support on the field, specially to Commander Francisco Lupiani (outpost 2011) and Commander Antonio Casals (outpost 2012). Also thanks to the military members of the Argentinean Deception Base, especially to Commander Cristian Carrizo (outpost 2012). Thanks also to Peter Fretwell from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) for the Deception map. We would like to thank the Drs. Birgit Njaastad and Veronica Vallejos who contributed to largely improve the document. And thanks especially to Drs. Kevin A Hughes and Tina Tin, from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and Antarctic & Southern Ocean Coalition (ASOC) respectively, for their advice.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luis R. Pertierra
    • 1
    Email author
  • Pablo Tejedo
    • 1
  • Javier Benayas
    • 1
  1. 1.Departamento de EcologíaUniversidad Autónoma de MadridMadridSpain

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