Disrupting the Hegemonic Construction of Student Achievement: Diasporic Spaces

Chapter
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 29)

Abstract

If we do not take action based on critical ideas and agentive work, we will continue to contribute to the academic failure of many diverse children and their inability to function as citizens in a democracy. This chapter argues for the charting of new routes within the field of education, seeking innovative, experimental, and nontraditional methods of teaching and learning to replace outdated Eurocentric models that ignore diasporic students’ multiple ways of knowing and, in particular, ignore or discredit their funds of knowledge as viable resource for classroom instruction. In asserting the classroom as a political site of struggle, the chapter presents the transformative work of a teacher leader who utilized grassroots leadership to assert the voice of children and disrupt the hegemonic construction of student achievement. In presenting this ideology, I embed autobiographical data within the framework of narrative inquiry, to situate the teacher as a political agent of change working within the classroom to implement pedagogy of conscientization that will have a lasting impact on the lives of students as it prepares them to assume the critical role as citizens within the global environment.

Keywords

Social Justice Transformative Leader Critical Literacy Diverse Student School Site 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Independent ResearcherPembroke Pines City Charter SchoolPembroke PinesUSA

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