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Energy Based Interference Avoidance Scheme in Ubiquitous Medical Environments

  • Jin-Woo Kim
  • Myeong Soo Choi
  • Yeonwoo Lee
  • Beommu Kim
  • Seyeong Maeng
  • Seongmin Jeon
  • Shyuk Park
  • Seong Ro Lee
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 235)

Abstract

WLAN and WPAN technologies will play an important role in ubiquitous healthcare application. In this paper, we propose an energy based interference avoidance scheme in ubiquitous medical environment using 2.4 GHz unlicensed industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) bands. This paper focuses on the coexistence of WLAN (IEEE 802.11b) and WPAN (IEEE 802.15.4) in the 2.4 GHz band. In the proposed scheme, we propose a new energy detection (ED) estimation scheme to detect interference from another network. The experiment and simulation results show that the proposed system improves coexistence performance required for ubiquitous medical environments.

Keywords

WLAN WPAN Coexistence Heterogeneous networks Ubiquitous healthcare 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by Priority Research Centers Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2009-0093828). “This research was supported by the The Ministry of Knowledge Economy (MKE), Korea, under the Information Technology Research Center (ITRC) support program supervised by the National IT Industry Promotion Agency (NIPA)”(NIPA-2012-H0301-12-2005).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jin-Woo Kim
    • 1
  • Myeong Soo Choi
    • 1
  • Yeonwoo Lee
    • 1
  • Beommu Kim
    • 1
  • Seyeong Maeng
    • 1
  • Seongmin Jeon
    • 1
  • Shyuk Park
    • 1
  • Seong Ro Lee
    • 1
  1. 1.Mokpo National UniversityMokpoSouth Korea

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