Aspects of Family Resilience in Various Groups of South African Families

Chapter
Part of the Cross-Cultural Advancements in Positive Psychology book series (CAPP, volume 4)

Abstract

Although relatively little research has been conducted on family resilience qualities, researchers, such as M. A. McCubbin and McCubbin (Resiliency in families: a conceptual model of family adjustment and adaptation in response to stress and crises. In: McCubbin HI, Thompson AI, McCubbin MA (eds) Family assessment: resiliency, coping, and adaptation – inventories for research and practice. University of Wisconsin System, Madison, pp 1–64, 1996) and Walsh (Normal family processes: growing diversity and complexity. The Guilford Press, New York, 2003), have developed comprehensive theories that may be used fruitfully by others. In this chapter, a short overview is given of published studies on family resilience qualities in various family populations in South Africa. The findings indicate that certain qualities, such as family hardiness and community integration, are generally present in order to enable the family to adapt to a crisis. Some other qualities, such as seeking social support and family chores, appear to be of more interest when required by a specific crisis or a specific type of family. Lastly, recommendations for future research are made.

Keywords

Crisis Situation Family Adaptation Family Quality Family Resilience Resiliency Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of StellenboschStellenboschSouth Africa

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