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The Climate–Migration Nexus: A Reorientation

Chapter

Abstract

The introduction discusses the current ‘climate migrant’ debate. It further elaborates on the topic of ‘climate migration’ from a sociological view point and introduces the chapters of the book.

Keywords

Climate migrant debate Migration theory Numbers Sociology Uncertainty 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of SociologyBielefeld UniversityBielefeldGermany

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