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Land Management and Biodiversity Through Time in Upper Ribblesdale, North Yorkshire, UK: Understanding the Impact of Traditional Management

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Cultural Severance and the Environment

Part of the book series: Environmental History ((ENVHIS,volume 2))

Abstract

The role of anthropogenic land use in the maintenance of culturally-derived ecosystems has been central to the development of thinking in the ecosystems approach (CBD 2000; Defra 2007, 2010). It is now widely recognised that in Europe, where there is a long cultural history of land use, the highly valued semi-natural habitats of the upland commons rely on traditional management techniques for their maintenance and survival. Similarly the gradual greening of the Common Agricultural Policy as a post-productivist environmental payment provides added incentive to combine policy for social and ecological systems and to highlight the value of traditional management.

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Acknowledgments

This research is funded by a research grant from the Leverhulme Trust. We thank the relevant farmers and landowners, Natural England and the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority for access to land and advice in locating peat deposits.

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Correspondence to Helen Shaw .

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Shaw, H., Whyte, I. (2013). Land Management and Biodiversity Through Time in Upper Ribblesdale, North Yorkshire, UK: Understanding the Impact of Traditional Management. In: Rotherham, I. (eds) Cultural Severance and the Environment. Environmental History, vol 2. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6159-9_21

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