Introduction

  • Nazrul Hoque
  • Mary A. McGehee
  • Benjamin S. Bradshaw
Chapter
Part of the Applied Demography Series book series (ADS, volume 3)

Abstract

Applied demography is an ever-evolving field that is applicable to a number of disciplines (Siegel 2002; Murdock and Swanson 2010). It is a subfield of basic demography, which is the study of human populations and the size, composition, and spatial distribution of these populations and the related processes of fertility, mortality, and migration. Unlike basic demography which is primarily concerned with increasing knowledge about how these processes lead to demographic change, the focus of applied demography is understanding the consequences of demographic change, including the related social and economic consequences and their application to decisions related to policy development, planning, the distribution of goods and services, etc. in a specific area (Murdock and Ellis 1991).

Keywords

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Public Health Practice Basic Demography National Family Health Survey Healthy Life Expectancy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Graunt, J. (1662). Natural and political observations mentioned in a following index, and made upon the bills of mortality. New York: Evergreen Review, Inc.Google Scholar
  2. Murdock, S. H., & Ellis, D. R. (1991). Applied demography: An introduction to basic concepts, methods, and data. Boulder: West View Press.Google Scholar
  3. Murdock, S. H., & Swanson, D. A. (Eds.). (2008). Applied demography in the 21st century (pp. 3–10). New York: Springer Science+Business Media B.V.Google Scholar
  4. Siegel, J. (2002). Applied demography: Applications to business, government, law and public policy. San Diego: Academic.Google Scholar
  5. Turnock, B. J. (2008). Public health: What it is and how it works. Sudbury: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nazrul Hoque
    • 1
  • Mary A. McGehee
    • 2
  • Benjamin S. Bradshaw
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Demography and Institute for Demographic and Socioeconomic ResearchThe University of TexasSan AntonioUSA
  2. 2.Arkansas Department of HealthHealth Statistics Branch, Center for Public Health PracticeLittle RockUSA
  3. 3.Management, Policy & Community Health DivisionThe University of Texas School of Public HealthSan AntonioUSA

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