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Frege’s Approach to Logic

  • Carlo Cellucci
Chapter
Part of the Logic, Argumentation & Reasoning book series (LARI, volume 1)

Abstract

While, throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth century, the quest for a logic of discovery is a live question, the situation essentially changes with Frege. Although strongly influenced by Kant, Frege excludes induction and analogy from the domain of logic. For him, there cannot be a logic of discovery but only a logic of justification based on deduction, and the goal of logic is the study of deduction.

Keywords

Mathematical Practice Basic Proposition Logical Axiom Logical Source Intellectual Intuition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlo Cellucci
    • 1
  1. 1.Sapienza University of RomeRomeItaly

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