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Abstract

This chapter examines the employment situation in the entry phase of the academic career and the respective changes in subsequent career stages across Europe. We compare career trajectories and the current career situation of academics in senior and junior positions according to type of higher education institution. Academic career paths differ due to varying national contexts based on far-reaching changes and reforms. Careers also differ in many other respects, including duration and phases of formation, connected academic qualification steps and the legal conditions for employment. The empirical analyses focus on the questions: What kinds of profile have those working in higher education under these changed conditions? Which career trajectories do they follow? How much does the employment situation actually vary between senior and junior academics?

In several countries, measures to increase the flexibility and to reduce financial liability of universities make it difficult for academics to achieve permanent full-time appointments. However, the professoriate still represents a highly attractive position. In many countries, the employment conditions of junior academics especially at universities are not very satisfying. In some countries, the annual earnings of junior academics are only slightly above the ‘at-risk-of-poverty’ level. This is not only true for the employment situation of academics at universities. The situation of academics at other institutions of higher education is more similar than one tends to assume.

Keywords

High Education Institution Doctoral Degree Academic Career Doctoral Training Senior Academic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Science Communication and Higher Education ResearchUniversity of KlagenfurtViennaAustria

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