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Youth Justice, Child Protection and the Role of the Youth Courts in the Northern Territory

  • Deborah WestEmail author
  • David Heath
Chapter
Part of the Children’s Well-Being: Indicators and Research book series (CHIR, volume 7)

Abstract

Child protection and youth justice are two domains which have historically been of strong sociopolitical interest in the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia. Within both of these domains, the courts play a central role in the complex systems through which policies become operable. Traditionally, the courts have faced difficult challenges within this context because the remoteness of much of the NT, inconsistent resourcing, cultural diversity and widespread variation in socio-economic outcomes are factors which, through their presence, have contributed to a dynamic policy context that has fluctuated between ideals of care, coercion, punishment and rehabilitation. This chapter explores the role of the courts through both exploration of current and past policies and direct reflection from 44 people who work in child protection and youth justice.

Keywords

Children’s Courts Youth justice Child protection Northern Territory Australia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Education and Training DevelopmentCharles Darwin UniversityDarwinAustralia
  2. 2.Social Work and Community StudiesCharles Darwin UniversityDarwinAustralia

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