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Tour Schedule Generation Integrating Restaurant Options for Electric Vehicles

  • Junghoon Lee
  • Hye-Hin Kim
  • Gyung-Leen Park
  • Byung-Jun Lee
  • Seulbi Lee
  • Dae-Yong Im
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 214)

Abstract

Targeting at a rent-a-car business based on electric vehicles, this paper designs a tour scheduling service which determines a multi-destination tour route, minimizing the waiting time for battery charging. Not just the visiting order, our work can select the best restaurant option capable of reducing the en-route waiting time. The waiting time can be reduced by overlapping charging operations with stay time in each tour place or restaurant. After formulating the per-spot waiting time based on the parameter definition of distance credit, our scheme traverses the search space to find the visiting sequence having the minimum waiting time as well as satisfying the given constraints on dining and precedence. This procedure iterates for the given set of restaurants a tourist selects. The performance measurement results obtained from a prototype implementation reveal that our scheme reduces the waiting time by up to 25 %, compared with classic traveling salesman problem.

Keywords

Electric vehicle Rent-a-car business Tour and charging schedule Dining options Waiting time reduction 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work (Grants No. C0026912) was supported by Business for Cooperative R&D between Industry, Academy, and Research Institute funded by Korea Small and Medium Business Administration in 2012

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Junghoon Lee
    • 1
  • Hye-Hin Kim
    • 1
  • Gyung-Leen Park
    • 1
  • Byung-Jun Lee
    • 1
  • Seulbi Lee
    • 1
  • Dae-Yong Im
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and StatisticsJeju National UniversityJeju-DoRepublic of Korea

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