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Efficacy of Mind-body Therapy on Stress Reduction in Cancer Care

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Part of the Evidence-based Anticancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine book series (ACAM,volume 4)

Abstract

Psychological stress in cancer patients has been identified as a significant and ongoing problem in oncology. Non-pharmacological interventions have been increasingly employed to facilitate coping with stressful circumstances. Mind-body therapies, which approach healthcare holistically as an interaction between mind, body, and spirit, have been studied as adjunctive therapies to reduce stress, enhance relaxation, reduce anxiety, and improve health outcomes. Mind-body therapies, including mindfulness/meditation, biofeedback, hypnosis, relaxation therapy, art therapy, Qigong, Taichi, and yoga have demonstrated efficacies in their potential to mitigate stress and improve the quality of life of cancer patients and survivors. Though the mind-body literature shows overwhelmingly positive results, methodological deficits hinder adoption as evidence-based palliative care for cancer survivors. Although additional research is warranted, the body of evidence presented in this chapter suggests that clinicians should give serious consideration to mind-body therapies when advising cancer patients and survivors on adjunctive treatment options.

Keywords

  • Mindfulness Meditation
  • Perceive Stress Scale
  • Waitlist Control Group
  • Yoga Intervention
  • MBSR Program

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Elkins, G., Johnson, A., Fisher, W., Sliwinski, J. (2013). Efficacy of Mind-body Therapy on Stress Reduction in Cancer Care. In: Cho, W. (eds) Evidence-based Non-pharmacological Therapies for Palliative Cancer Care. Evidence-based Anticancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol 4. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-5833-9_7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-5833-9_7

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