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Multiple Medication Use of Neuropsychiatry in Forensic Psychiatry: Findings from the Central State Forensic Psychiatric Hospital of Saxony-Anhalt

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Abstract

Neuropsychiatric treatment schemes differ considerably in forensic psychiatry compared to daily use in general psychiatric treatment facilities. On one hand, average treatment time usually is dramatically higher and on the other hand, patients dealt with are in danger to recommit serious crimes, if not treated adequately. Hereby, the use of neuropsychiatric polypharmacy might lead to more serious problems in forensic psychiatry, as the impact on risk reduction cannot be easily surveyed. This however, will be a necessary prerequisite of an adequate and as well safe treatment, if we wish to be successful in establishing ensured standards of treatment which will enable us to guarantee a sufficient risk prevention for general society. However, the benefits of the use of multiple medication schemes in terms of neuropsychiatry can be achieved by a very special control of patients and an obligatory ambulant aftercare, when treatment in detention facilities is accomplished.

Keywords

  • Polypharmacy
  • Forensic psychiatric treatment
  • Neuroleptics

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Correspondence to Joachim G. Witzel M.D. .

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Witzel, J.G. (2013). Multiple Medication Use of Neuropsychiatry in Forensic Psychiatry: Findings from the Central State Forensic Psychiatric Hospital of Saxony-Anhalt. In: Ritsner, M. (eds) Polypharmacy in Psychiatry Practice, Volume I. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-5805-6_6

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