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Stress Sensitization and Anticonvulsant Medication in Psychiatric Patients

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Abstract

Recent reported findings indicate that stress experiences are related to psychological and neurobiological processes that may have lasting consequences and significantly influence brain functions. Cognitive and emotional dysregulation related to traumatic stress is likely linked to deficits in inhibitory functions and increased limbic excitability that may lead to temporo-limbic seizure-like activity. These findings strongly suggest that stress-activated limbic kindling may be involved in the pathogenesis of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders which may explain efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in their treatment.

Keywords

  • Anticonvulsants
  • Depression
  • Epileptiform activity
  • Schizophrenia
  • Seizure-like symptoms
  • Sensitization
  • Stress
  • Trauma
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-94-007-5805-6_10
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Abbreviations

ACC:

Anterior Cingulate Cortex

BDNF:

Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor

EEG:

Electroencephalograph

GABA:

Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid

LSCL-33:

Limbic System Checklist

PTSD:

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

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Acknowledgements

The study was supported by the grant GACR P407/12/1957, project MSM0021620849 provided by Czech Ministry of education and the project “CEITEC – Central European Institute of Technology” (CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0068) from European Regional Development Fund.

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Correspondence to Petr Bob Ph.D. .

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Bob, P. (2013). Stress Sensitization and Anticonvulsant Medication in Psychiatric Patients. In: Ritsner, M. (eds) Polypharmacy in Psychiatry Practice, Volume I. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-5805-6_10

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