Current International Law Relating to Site Contamination

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter contains a detailed review of international, regional and bilateral law of relevance to site contamination, whilst noting that no binding international instrument exists on the issue. There is a particular focus on legal and policy developments in the areas of environmental protection, soil protection, chemicals and hazardous waste, state responsibility and civil liability. Comparisons and lessons are drawn from this review so as to inform the discussion of a possible international approach to site contamination in later chapters.

Keywords

Precautionary Principle Environmental Harm Soil Protection Civil Liability Site Contamination 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.TanundaAustralia

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