Advertisement

A Novel Fluorescence Spectroscopy Approach to Characterization of Interaction Between Humic Substances and Pyrene: Determination of Environmental Polarity

  • E. A. Shirshin
  • G. S. Budylin
  • N. Yu. Grechischeva
  • V. V. Fadeev
  • I. V. Perminova
Conference paper

Abstract

This study proposes a novel fluorescence spectroscopy approach that opens up additional possibilities for using pyrene as a polarity probe. In contrast to the standard approach that is based on measuring the ratio of pyrene vibronic peak intensities, our approach uses the ratio of pyrene integral fluorescence intensity upon excitation into vibronically coupled first and second singlet states: transition probabilities from the ground to those excited electronic states demonstrate opposite trends with environmental polarity variations. In our work, the existence of this effect has been demonstrated for aqueous solutions of pyrene with varying concentrations of humic substances. This provides independent evidence of the non-zero fluorescence quantum yield of pyrene molecules bound by humic substances and indicates their lower environmental polarity. Moreover, the obtained results lay the groundwork for development of a reliable approach to quantitative characterization of pyrene interaction with humic substances.

Keywords

Fluorescence Humic substances Polarity probe Pyrene Vibronic coupling 

References

  1. Aschi, M., A. Fontana, E.M. Di Meo, C. Zazza, and A. Amadei. 2010. Characterization of electronic properties in complex molecular systems: Modelling a micropolarity probe. The Journal of Physical Chemistry B 99: 3951–3958.Google Scholar
  2. Kalyanasundaram, K., and J.K. Thomas. 1977. Environmental effects on vibronic band intensities in pyrene monomer fluorescence and their application in studies of micellar systems. Journal of the American Chemical Society 99: 2039–2044.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Karpovich, D.S., and G.J. Blanchard. 1995. Relating the polarity-dependent fluorescence response of pyrene to vibronic coupling. Achieving a fundamental understanding of the py polarity scale. The Journal of Physical Chemistry 99: 3951–3958.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Kumke, M.U., and F.H. Frimmel. 2000. Fluorescence of humic acids and pyrene-HA complexes at ultralow temperature. Environmental Science and Technology 34: 3818–3823.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Nakajima, A. 1971. Solvent effect on vibrational structures of the fluorescence and absorption spectra of pyrene. Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Japan 44: 3273–3277.Google Scholar
  6. Nakashima, K., M. Maki, F. Ishikawa, T. Yoshikawa, Y.K. Gong, and T. Miyajima. 2007. Fluorescence studies on binding of pyrene and its derivatives to humic acid. Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy 67: 930–935.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. von Wandruzska, R. 1998. The micellar model of humic acid: Evidence from pyrene fluorescence measurements. Soil Science 163: 921–930.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Zhejiang University Press and Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. A. Shirshin
    • 1
  • G. S. Budylin
    • 1
  • N. Yu. Grechischeva
    • 2
  • V. V. Fadeev
    • 1
  • I. V. Perminova
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsLomonosov Moscow State UniversityMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and GasMoscowRussia
  3. 3.Department of ChemistryLomonosov Moscow State UniversityMoscowRussia

Personalised recommendations