Volunteerism and Social Entrepreneurship Among Older In-migrants to Rural Areas

Chapter
Part of the Understanding Population Trends and Processes book series (UPTA, volume 7)

Abstract

We examine level of volunteerism among older in-migrants versus longer-term older residents in rural amenity destinations in the Continental US and Hawaii. We also use case study evidence to investigate social entrepreneurship among older in-migrants to rural amenity destinations. Our findings show that older in-migrants participate in voluntary activity approximately equally to longer-term older residents. Further, older in-migrants frequently engage in social entrepreneurship by starting new organizations or re-shaping already existing organizations and institutions in rural destination communities. Older in-migrants’ high level of participation is facilitated by their relatively high socioeconomic status.

Keywords

Botanical Garden Social Entrepreneurship Social Entrepreneur Case Study Site Case Study Evidence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Development SociologyCornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  2. 2.Center on the FamilyUniversity of Hawaii at ManoaHonoluluUSA

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