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Abstract

In this chapter, the multi-method research approach is adopted in order to achieve the research objectives: (a) methodological contribution for assessing V&A in a riverine flood prone case study area; (b) failed effect of adaptation i.e. economic consequences on farmers’ households. Various kinds of research techniques are involved with the multi-method research approach, these are: structured questionnaire survey for understanding farmers’ economic consequences of flooding within the socio-economic, demographic and environmental characteristics of farmers at household level; Participatory Rapid Appraisals (PRAs) for evaluating V&A scenarios and their importance in V&A assessment. An in-depth case study, field observation, literature review and professional judgment contribute to the understanding of the autonomous cropping adjustment processes of farmers in response to bio-physical interactions with flooding and flood research scenarios in Bangladesh from 1980 to 2014. Some key methodological issues are discussed in this chapter. The issues are: reasons for choosing a case study approach for understanding V&A assessment, an overview of the epistemological debate about qualitative and quantitative paradigms, procedures of appropriate sampling in V&A assessment, how and why to conduct a structured questionnaire survey in the flood-prone case study area, appropriateness of uses of PRAs and their advantages and disadvantages, and recent advancements in V&A assessment. This chapter concludes by describing how V&A issues in a vulnerable case study area can be identified, weighted and categorized in accordance with vulnerable farmers’ opinions through PRA sessions.

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Younus, M.A.F. (2014). Research Methodology. In: Vulnerability and Adaptation to Climate Change in Bangladesh. Springer Theses. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-5494-2_2

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