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Standard Methods for Measuring Growth of Algae and Their Composition

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Algae for Biofuels and Energy

Part of the book series: Developments in Applied Phycology ((DAPH,volume 5))

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to present a summary of techniques for measuring growth and analysing chemical composition of microalgae. There are perhaps as many methods and modifications to these methods as there are active phycologists today. Investigators generally employ their own particular adapted methodology. Here, we have attempted to include in this chapter those methods generally employed by several investigators, as well as having general applicability to different laboratories. Among the major methods discussed here are: cell counting, measuring growth techniques and biochemical compositions (lipid, carbohydrates and protein). The audience for whom this chapter is intended is diverse and includes junior to experienced phycologist and/or non-phycologists.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Lugol’s Iodine solution is prepared by dissolving 10 g I2 (toxic !) and 20 g KI in 200 mL distilled water. Add 20 mL concentrated glacial acetic acid a few days before use. Store in the dark, preferably in a glass bottle with a glass stopper. This solution, if properly stored, should remain effective for about 12 months.

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Correspondence to Navid Reza Moheimani .

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Moheimani, N.R., Borowitzka, M.A., Isdepsky, A., Sing, S.F. (2013). Standard Methods for Measuring Growth of Algae and Their Composition. In: Borowitzka, M., Moheimani, N. (eds) Algae for Biofuels and Energy. Developments in Applied Phycology, vol 5. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-5479-9_16

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