No Choice – No Guidance? The Rising Demand for Career Guidance in EU Neighbouring Countries and Its Potential Implications for Apprenticeships

Chapter
Part of the Technical and Vocational Education and Training: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (TVET, volume 18)

Abstract

While countries neighbouring to the European Union (EU) are not isolated from the international trend towards rediscovering apprenticeships as a vocational education and training (VET) pathway, provision of career guidance services to support this development remains still underdeveloped – both prior and within VET careers. A study of the European Training Foundation (ETF) revealed contextual features that act as barriers to career guidance development, such as the informal economy, the tradition of informal guidance and in general more limited choices (no choice – no guidance?). Simultaneously, the need and demand for such services is huge and seems to be on the rise. This chapter identifies push and pull factors shaping the demand for career guidance and introduces emerging examples of policies and practices. Widening the access and shifting the mode of delivery towards a combination of the new career guidance paradigm (emphasis on career management skills, work ‘tasting’ and work experience) with resource-efficient approaches (career information, self-help) would likely contribute to improve school-to-work transitions. It might also help to overcome stereotypes and barriers for choosing VET and apprenticeships as viable career options.

Keywords

European Union Career Guidance Private Tutoring Public Employment Service Guidance Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Thematic Expertise Development Department (TED)ETF – European Training FoundationTorinoItaly

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