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Incorporating Social and Natural Science in the Restoration of an Indonesian Conservation Forest: A Case Study from Jambi

  • Ulfah J. Siregar
  • Iskandar Z. Siregar
  • S. Wilarso Budi
  • Yulius Hero
  • Didik Suharjito
  • Hardjanto
Chapter
Part of the World Forests book series (WFSE, volume 16)

Abstract

Although large areas of forest in Indonesia have been degraded it has proved difficult to implement large-scale forest restoration programs to overcome this degradation. Some of the difficulties are illustrated by a forest restoration project undertaken at Grand Forest Park Sultan Thaha Syaidfuddin, in Jambi Province, Indonesia. Following a period of poorly regulated logging and uncontrolled agricultural clearing the area contained a mosaic of secondary forests, grasslands and agricultural crops. Although the central government had designated the area as a conservation reserve a number of farmers remained living there even though they lacked formal land tenure. Responsibility for restoring forests and managing the area passed from the central government to local government. Planning forest restoration in the area was undertaken following discussions between villager communities, government agencies, NGOs and local university staff. A high priority was given to making forest restoration an attractive land use activity for villagers in the area. Several types of reforestation were undertaken in different areas including restoration of a secondary forest area, reforestation of severely degraded sites and grasslands with timber species and reforestation involving agroforestry techniques. Promising results were obtained although there were differences between sites depending on the species being used and the support provided by the villagers involved. The major problem with implementing reforestation on a large scale in this area has been to maintain continuity. The project ended in 2006 when funding ceased. Since that time many of the government staff supervising the project have been replaced and left the area. Many of the new staff are not aware of the background to the project and have been unable to maintain it.

Keywords

Forest Area Secondary Forest Forest Resource Land Tenure Ecological Restoration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ulfah J. Siregar
    • 1
  • Iskandar Z. Siregar
    • 1
  • S. Wilarso Budi
    • 1
  • Yulius Hero
    • 2
  • Didik Suharjito
    • 2
  • Hardjanto
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Silviculture, Faculty of ForestryBogor Agricultural UniversityBogorIndonesia
  2. 2.Department of Forest Management, Faculty of ForestryBogor Agricultural UniversityBogorIndonesia

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