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The Role of Forest Landscape Restoration in Supporting a Transition Towards More Sustainable Coastal Development

  • Peter R. Burbridge
Chapter
Part of the World Forests book series (WFSE, volume 15)

Abstract

This paper presents a case for integrating Forest Landscape Restoration into the principles and practice of Integrated Coastal Management as a means of supporting the transition towards more sustainable use of coastal areas and coastal ecosystems. Two examples of non-sustainable use of coastal forest systems are presented to illustrate how Forest Landscape Restoration could be used to support the return of these systems to productive use as well as helping to maintain the health and productivity of other coastal ecosystems. The compatibility of the principles for Integrated Coastal Management and Forest Landscape Restoration is examined to illustrate how these two development planning and management mechanisms can be integrated. Common obstacles to the implementation of Integrated Coastal Management and Forest Landscape Restoration are identified and elements of good practice that can be used to overcome such obstacles are presented. The paper concludes with the identification of potential social and economic benefits that could be derived from integrating Forest Landscape Restoration into the principles and practice of Integrated Coastal Management.

Keywords

Coastal Ecosystem Watershed Management Coastal System Wetland Forest Coastal Forest 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Marine Science and TechnologyUniversity of Newcastle-upon-TyneNewcastleUK

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