Experimental Indication of Quantum Mechanical Effects in Surface Enhanced IR-Spectroscopy?

  • Jorg Bochterle
  • F. Neubrech
  • D. Enders
  • T. Nagao
  • A. Pucci
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics book series (NAPSB)

Abstract

The conduction electrons of metal nanoparticles can be collectively excited by incident electromagnetic radiation. Their resonance frequency strongly depends on the geometric dimensions of the particles and can be tuned from the classical radio frequencies up to the visible range. Such resonantly excited localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) are accompanied by an electromagnetic nearfield enhancement which is concentrated at the surface. In the infrared (IR) spectral range these huge local fields can be applied to the enhancement of infrared vibrations of molecules. Using this technique, which is called surface enhanced infrared spectroscopy (SEIRS), with gold nanostripes, attomol sensitivity has been achieved [1].

In this contribution we show first results of the resonant signal enhancement of the carbon monoxide (CO) stretching vibration of physisorbed CO multilayers on micrometer-long gold nanoantennas on silicon substrates under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. We cooled the sample to about 18 K to allow multilayer adsorption of CO gas.

The preliminary results show signal changes with increasing CO layer thickness which exhibit a behavior differing from classical expectations and are in accord to recent quantum mechanical predictions [2]. In the near future we will conduct systematic experiments to prove the origin of these deviations.

Keywords

Carbon Monoxide Radio Frequency Silicon Substrate Metal Nanoparticles Electromagnetic Radiation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Neubrech F, Pucci A, Cornelius TW, Karim S, Garcia-Etxarri A, Aizpurua J (2008) Resonant plasmonic and vibrational coupling in a tailored nanoantenna for infrared detection. Phys Rev Lett 101:157403ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Zuloaga J, Prodan E, Nordlander P (2010) Quantum plasmonics: optical properties and tunability of metallic nanorods. ACS Nano 4:5269–5276CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jorg Bochterle
    • 1
  • F. Neubrech
    • 1
  • D. Enders
    • 2
  • T. Nagao
    • 2
  • A. Pucci
    • 1
  1. 1.Kirchhoff-Institute for PhysicsUniversität HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS)TsukubaJapan

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