Deep UV Strategy for Discriminating Biomolecules

  • Svetlana Afonina
  • O. Nenadl
  • A. Rondi
  • S. Weber
  • L. Bonacina
  • D. Kiselev
  • J. Extermann
  • M. Roth
  • J. Roslund
  • H. Rabitz
  • Jean-Pierre Wolf
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics book series (NAPSB)

Abstract

Label-free selective discrimination of spectrally similar biomolecules, such as peptides and proteins using Optimal Control strategies is a challenge in a variety of practical applications such as label-free fluorescence imaging and protein identification. The principle of Optimal Control is based on the fact that a suitably shaped laser field can differently drive the dynamics of almost identical quantum systems [1, 2].

Most of the biomolecules (including DNA) have absorption bands in the deep UV, a spectral region that is hardly accessible by transmissive devices. MEMS pulse-shapers using Reflective -Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) have proven their broadband applicability for femtosecond pulse shaping [3, 4], even in deep UV and are capable of re-compressing spectrally broadened UV pulses with a closed-loop approach based on a genetic algorithm.

Recent experiments demonstrate that discriminating between nearly identical flavin molecules is possible using a reflective pulse shaping technique. We demonstrate that discrimination is possible between amino-acids, so the Optimal Control of complex systems such as proteins is envisioned as an all-optical method for identification of biomolecules.

Keywords

Genetic Algorithm Pulse Shaping Laser Field Femtosecond Pulse Optimal Control Strategy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Roth M, Guyon L, Roslund J, Boutou V, Courvoisier F, Wolf J-P, Rabitz H (2009) Quantum control of tightly competitive product channels. Phys Rev Lett 102:253001ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Petersen J, Mitric R, Bonacic-Koutecky V, Wolf J-P, Roslund J, Rabitz H (2010) How shaped light discriminates nearly identical biochromophores. Phys Rev Lett 105:073003ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Weber S, Extermann J, Bonacina L, Noell W, Kiselev D, Waldis S, de Rooij N, Wolf J-P (2010) Ultraviolet and near-infrared femtosecond temporal pulse shaping with a new high-aspect-ratio one-dimensional micromirror array. Opt Lett 35:3102–3104ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Extermann J, Weber SM, Kiselev D, Bonacina L, Lani S, Jutzi F, Noell W, de Rooij NF, Wolf J-P (2011) Spectral phase, amplitude, and spatial modulation from ultraviolet to infrared with a reflective MEMS pulse shaper. Opt Express 19:7580ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Svetlana Afonina
    • 1
  • O. Nenadl
    • 1
  • A. Rondi
    • 1
  • S. Weber
    • 2
  • L. Bonacina
    • 1
  • D. Kiselev
    • 1
  • J. Extermann
    • 1
  • M. Roth
    • 3
  • J. Roslund
    • 3
  • H. Rabitz
    • 3
  • Jean-Pierre Wolf
    • 1
  1. 1.GAP-BiophotonicsUniversity of GenevaGenèveSwitzerland
  2. 2.EPFL/STI/IMT-NE/SAMLABNeuchâtelSwitzerland
  3. 3.Department of ChemistryPrinceton UniversityPrincetonUSA

Personalised recommendations