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Objectives and Performance Indicators for Biological Features

  • Mike Alexander
Chapter

Abstract

Objectives should lie at the very heart of a management plan; they are the outcomes of management and the single most important component of any plan. An objective is the description of something that we want to achieve. Wildlife outcomes are habitats, communities or populations at a favourable status. Objectives must be quantified so that they can be monitored. This is quite a tall order: an objective is a multi-purpose statement that describes the required outcome of a feature (something that we want to achieve) using both plain and quantified scientific language. The solution is to prepare composite statements that combine a vision for the feature with quantified and measurable performance indicators. A number of performance indicators can be used to quantify the objective and provide the evidence that a feature is in a favourable condition or otherwise. Two different kinds of performance indicators are used to monitor an objective. Specified limits define the degree to which the value of a performance indicator is allowed to fluctuate without creating any cause for concern. In many ways, specified limits can be regarded as limits of confidence. When the values of all the performance indicators fall within the specified limits, we can be confident that the feature is at Favourable Conservation Status.

Keywords

Management Plan Performance Indicator Dead Wood Precautionary Principle Keystone Species 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.CMSCTalgarth, Brecon PowysUK

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