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The Internet Policy of China 2

Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 181)

Abstract

China is the biggest Internet powerhouse with over a whopping 500 million Internet-users. Chinese government has been nurturing Internet industry as a core growing industry. At the same time, China uses Internet industry as a way to rule its country. The Chinese government has promoted open-door policy for economic development. On the other hand, it imposes various controls on political freedom. The Chinese government tightens its censorship on the Internet use of its people. The government’s Internet policy is twofold; one is political restriction and the other is economic development.

Keywords

Internet policy of China Internet policy China Internet industry Electronic information industry Internet fostering policy Internet control policy Websites 12.5 plan 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Chinese StudiesKyung Hee Cyber UniversitySeoulSouth Korea

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